A software-defined future: the key to customer-centric transformation

Tikiri Wanduragala

Monday 11 September 2017

We now live in a highly connected world – one in which consumers manage their daily lives in real time, juggling a combination of apps with precision and agility: they plan meals, do 3D room planning, select, book and rate babysitters, touch up holiday photos, and so on.

As with many technology-driven consumer evolutions, this real-time, customer-centric trend is no exception in that it has been transposed into the business space. In the quest for greater speed and agility, large companies in particular are figuring out how to renew and upgrade legacy systems quickly and at minimal cost. At the same time, they’re taking on more recent players, many of whom have already placed software development and applications at the heart of their business model.

So we know there is a real desire to drive customer-centric transformation among businesses. And coincidentally, significant advances in technology are making this possible – notably the cloud, AI, machine learning, and developments in memory and storage. The combination of the two represents an inflection point in the market which is driving significant change in the way businesses approach technology. And at the centre of this lie data centres and virtualisation.

Tikiri Quote 1
In tangible terms, we will see an increasing number of companies implement a package of hardware and software, operating independently of each other for maximum agility. To really future-proof a business, the focus will be on software – with all skills, resources, strategic thinking, and customer conversations driving the development of applications. This will lead to a scenario whereby future technologies will be incorporated into simple-to-use solution ‘building blocks’, enabling data centre infrastructure to make the most of the largest high performance computing environments.

Another significant change underway is the increasing virtualization of storage, networking and computing, which puts even more power into the application, and as such further boosts their agility and reduces costs for businesses.

In time, this software-driven approach to technology is the enabler for ‘digitalisation’. It is also this software-centricity that will make organisations become fluid and agile, capable of adjusting in real-time, scaling up and down as required, and delivering flawless customer service in a constantly-changing environment.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Building the next-gen data centre

Where traditional and web-scale apps co-exist